Catheters or sounds (urethral sounding)

Sounding refers to the insertion of a catheter or medical sound or probe into your urethra. Sounding is a kinky sexual technique that gives a special sensation but also carries certain risks.

As your urethra is essentially sterile and can easily become infected, it is important to use only clean materials and lube when sounding. To prevent the spread of STIs, never share your toys with your sex partners.

Using sounds and catheters

Sounding usually involves sounds or catheters. A bladder catheter is a flexible plastic tube that you can insert inside your body through your urethra. It is designed for medical purposes.  A sound is a rigid tube, usually made of metal. Since sounds are not flexible, using them can damage your urethra more easily. 

Inserting a catheter or sound into your urethra can introduce bacteria into a space where they do not belong. Inserting a catheter can lead to urethritis and bladder infections. 

Preventing problems related to sounding

If you want to use catheters or sounds during sex, observe the following rules to avoid infections:

  • Buy sterile catheters at your pharmacy. 
  • Thoroughly clean the sounds before each use. Disinfect them with boiling water. Don't use any disinfectants that could irritate your urethra.
  • Wash your hands with soap and rinse your penis off thoroughly in advance. 
  • Use plenty of sterile lube. Your pharmacy should sell 'katheterpurine', which is made especially for this purpose. An alternative to that is water-based lube. Always discard the first little bit of lube that comes out of the tube since it may no longer be sterile.
  • Don't damage your urethra. Start with a catheter or sound of a small diameter. Be very careful when pushing it in or pulling it out, especially at the entrance to the bladder. 
  • To prevent the spread of STIs, do not share your sound or catheters with your sex partner.

Burning sensation after sounding.

If you have been stimulating your urethra, it is normal to feel a burning sensation after you piss or come. In most cases, it will recover quickly. If the (burning) pain or loss of blood continues for more than a couple of days, consult your family doctor. The sounding may have caused an infection. 

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